Directions : In the following passage, some of the words have been left out. First read the passage over and try to understand what it is about. Then fill in the blanks with the help of the alternatives given.

Squirrels are (901) animals in the world. They have the (902) for rainy
days. Autumn can be very entertaining
for them. That is the time (903)
the great harvest collection for their winter
store. You can (904) here and there,
collecting nuts of all sorts. Walnuts,
beechnuts, chestnuts, dried berries.
They are not fussy. Relentlessly, they
run from their storage point, usually a
tree hollow, to the vast amount of wild
nuts to be found in the forest.
These beautiful animals are houseproud.
They take great pains to ensure
that (905) and warm enough to tide
them over the harsh winter. You (906)
busily collecting soft pieces of bark,
wood and leaves to line their nests.
After all their (907), and when the
first, cold hard frost arrives, they (908)
inside their nests for the duration/rest
of the cold spell. There, (909) till it is
warm enough to bring out their stored
food. Ah but then again, they are the
most forgetful little animals, and it is
not unusual to see squirrels (910) their
hoards.
901. (1) the more resource
(2) this most resourceful
(3) the most resource
(4) the most resourceful
902. (1) knack of saving down
(2) knack of saving on
(3) knack of saved up
(4) knack of saving up
903. (1) what they begin
(2) when they begin
(3) when their begin
(4) when them begin
904. (1) see them scampering
(2) seeing them scampered
(3) seen them scampering
(4) see their scampering
905. (1) their nest is secure
(2) their nest is securing
(3) they nest is secure
(4) there nest is secure
906. (1) is saw them
(2) will seen them
(3) will saw them
(4) will see them
907. (1) scavenging is done
(2) scavenged is done
(3) scavenged was done
(4) scavenging is doing
908. (1) will sealing themselves
(2) will be seal themselves
(3) will seal themselves
(4) are seal themselves
909. (1) they will hibernating
(2) they are hibernated
(3) them will hibernate
(4) they will hibernate
910. (1) search desperate at
(2) searching desperates for
(3) searching desperately for
(4) searched desperately for
Question No. (911–920) :
(SSC CHSL (10+2) LDC, DEO ,oa
PA/SA ijh{kk 06.12.2015
TF NO. 3441135, f}rh; ikyh)
Although we can (911) the (912)
bodies of our solar system (913) a telescope,
it is only (914) who can (915)
the depths of outer space. It is reported
that they have seen (916) galaxies,
stars taking (917) and (918), and ‘black
holes’. They say that the deeper they
look (919) the universe, the more they
know (920) the universe originated.
911. (1) observe (2) look
(3) reach (4) find
912. (1) heaven (2) heavier
(3) heavy (4) heavenly
913. (1) at (2) by
(3) through (4) with
914. (1) astronomers (2) astrology
(3) astrologers (4) astronomy
915. (1) views (2) overview
(3) view (4) viewed
916. (1) stunned (2) stunning
(3) shine (4) stun
917. (1) borne (2) birth
(3) berth (4) born
918. (1) dyeing (2) died
(3) die (4) dying
919. (1) at (2) on
(3) through (4) into
920. (1) why (2) how
(3) where (4) what
Question No. (921–930) :
(SSC CHSL (10+2) LDC, DEO ,oa PA/SA
ijh{kk 20.12.2015, TF No. 9692918,
izFke ikyh)
Smile, they say, and soon there will
be miles and miles of smiles. If we keep
(921) ourselves and do not mix with
others, we shall be left alone to ponder
(922) the misfortunes of life. Nobody
likes to come across a (923) and selfcentred
person. People (924) gregarious
and outgoing souls who are prepared
to share their joys and sorrows
and have the (925) to laugh (926) their
problems and miseries. Laughter brings
people (927) whereas keeping to oneself
distances people. It has (928) been
rightly said that laughter is the shortest
distance between two persons. Once
they (929) together, the circle of acquaintance,
and consequently friendship
(930), thus making the world a happy
place to live in.
921. (1) to (2) with
(3) into (4) by
922. (1) into (2) at
(3) upon (4) over
923. (1) comic (2) glum
(3) unselfish (4) kind
924. (1) dislike (2) hate
(3) opt (4) like
925. (1) feeling (2) intention
(3) sense (4) capacity
926. (1) away (2) on
(3) at (4) over
927. (1) closer (2) far
(3) apart (4) home
928. (1) so (2) however
(3) therefore (4) hence
SEH–810
CLOZE TEST
929. (1) come (2) sit
(3) are (4) go
930. (1) broadens (2) grows
(3) lessens (4) widens
Question No. (931–940) :
(SSC (10+2) LVsuksxzkiQj xzsM&‘C’ ,oa ‘D’
ijh{kk 31.01.2016)
I will always (931) the trip I made
to the zoo in 1988. It was then that I
(932) measles from one of my friends.
Peter, who had (933) along too.
Before he met us at the zoo, he
had gone to visit his cousin who was
(934) from measles. The next day, Peter
was (935) of a sore throat, a bad
cold and high fever. When he was diagnosed
by a doctor as having measles,
his parents rang me up to warn
me that I had been (936) to measles
too. By the next day, I was also showing/
having the same symptoms. My
doctor (937) me to stay at home for
the next two weeks.
I was quite pleased with the doctor’s
instruction. I spent the time reading
story-books, (938) to music and
watching television. When I get bored,
I would call up Peter, who also had to
spend two weeks at home, for a chat.
Unfortunately, the two weeks passed
too/by quickly. When we (939) to
school, we had to work twice as hard
to (940) with our classmates. It was
definitely not worth the ‘holiday’.
931. (1) remember
(2) remembered
(3) be remember
(4) remembering
932. (1) catch (2) will catch
(3) caught (4) catching
933. (1) went (2) gone
(3) going (4) go
934. (1) recover (2) revealed
(3) removed (4) recovering
935. (1) complained (2) complain
(3) complaining (4) explained
936. (1) exposed (2) exposing
(3) expose (4) exposable
937. (1) advise (2) advised
(3) is advised (4) advising
938. (1) listening (2) looking
(3) listen (4) listened
939. (1) returning (2) is returned
(3) return (4) returned
940. (1) caught up (2) catching up
(3) catch up (4) catch
Question No. (941–950) :
(SSC (10+2) LVsuksxzkiQj xzsM&‘C’ ,oa ‘D’
ijh{kk 31.01.2016)
The Red Indians (941) for the arrival
of the bison. The beasts, which
come only once a year, are a good
source of meat and hide. The Red Indians
(942) to survive the cold, bitter
winter.
Tikki, the young boy, (943) to look
out for herd’s arrival. Everyday, he
(944) to the top of the hill to see if he
could spot them on the vast horizon.
One night, while he (945) the
ground shook (946) and his bag of arrows
fell off from its hook on the wall.
Tikki (947) of his wigwam and felt a
strong gust of wind and dust gush past
him. Shouting excitedly, he ran to the
other wigwams and woke everyone up.
A big fire (948) built and the Red Indians
danced around it, giving praises
to their God who had, at last, (949)
their food and clothing of animal hide.
The next morning, all the warriors (950)
to hunt down the beasts which were
grazing near the river.
941. (1) were waiting
(2) is waiting
(3) were waited
(4) are waited
942. (1) needing these
(2) needed these
(3) needed their
(4) needing this
943. (1) was choose
(2) is choose
(3) was chose
(4) was chosen
944. (1) would running
(2) will running
(3) would run
(4) will be running
945. (1) is sleep
(2) was sleeping
(3) was sleep
(4) were slept
946. (1) violently (2) violence
(3) violent (4) violet
947. (1) rushing out (2) rush out
(3) rushed out (4) rushed in
948. (1) were immediately
(2) was immediate
(3) were immediate
(4) was immediately
949. (1) send them (2) sent them
(3) sent their (4) send their
950. (1) is assigned
(2) was assigning
(3) were assigned
(4) were assigning
Question No. (951–960) :
(SSC (10+2) LVsuksxzkiQj xzsMμ‘C’ ,oa ‘D’
ijh{kkμ31-01-2016] TF No. 3513283)
I will always (951) the trip I made
to the zoo in 1988. It was then that I
(952) measles from one of my friends.
Peter, who had (953) along too.
Before he met us at the zoo, he
had gone to visit his cousin who was
(954) from measles. The next day, Peter
was (955) of a sore throat, a bad cold
and high fever. When he was diagnosed
by a doctor as having measles, his
parents rang me up to warn me that
he had been (956) to measles too. By
the next day, I was also showing/having
the same symptoms. My doctor (957)
me to stay at home for the next two
weeks.
I was qui te pleased wi th the
doctor’s instruction. I spent the time
reading story-books, (958) to music
and watching television. When I got
bored, I would call up Peter, who also
had to spend two weeks at home, for a
chat. Unfortunately, the two weeks
passed by quickly. When we (959) to
school, we had to work twice as hard
to (960) with our classmates. It was
definitely not worth the ‘holiday’.
951. (1) remember
(2) remembered
(3) be remember
(4) remembering
952. (1) catch (2) will catch
(3) caught (4) catching
953. (1) went (2) gone
(3) going (4) go
954. (1) recover (2) revealed
(3) removed (4) recovering
955. (1) complained
(2) complain
(3) complaining
(4) explained
956. (1) exposed (2) exposing
(3) expose (4) exposable
957. (1) advise (2) advised
(3) is advised (4) advising
958. (1) listening (2) looking
(3) listen (4) listened
SEH–811
CLOZE TEST
959. (1) returning
(2) is returned
(3) return
(4) returned
960. (1) caught up
(2) catching up
(3) catch up
(4) catch
Question No. (961–970) :
(SSC LVsuksxzkiQj xzsM&‘C’ ,oa ‘D’
ijh{kk 14.09.2017 izFke ikyh)
Interestingly, rice hats were used
in the old days when (961) were fought
(962) and there was (963) of being attacked
without (964). Khowpuk or rice
cakes made of (965) rice, salt and (966)
sesame were (967) into hats and left
to (968). The (969) of this hat was
(970) known to the farmer.
961. (1) quarreled
(2) squabbled
(3) fought
(4) won
962. (1) mercifully
(2) relentlessly
(3) beautifully
(4) splendidly
963. (1) danger
(2) interest
(3) ambush
(4) injury
964. (1) warning
(2) food
(3) clothes
(4) money
965. (1) leftover
(2) dry
(3) glutinous
(4) wet
966. (1) powdered
(2) wet
(3) brown
(4) raw
967. (1) broken
(2) turned
(3) converted
(4) fashioned
968. (1) fry
(2) dry
(3) soak
(4) wet
969. (1) advantages
(2) colours
(3) benefit
(4) snacks
970. (1) good (2) better
(3) well (4) not
Question No. (971–975) :
(SSC CAPFs (CPO) SI ,oa ASI, fnYyh iqfyl
ijh{kk 20-03-2016 f}rh; ikyh)
It’s soccer’s newest power player;
a ball called the Soccket generates and
stores energy as players kick it, then
provides energy at home. Fifteen
minutes on the field ( I ) enough energy
to power a small light for three hours
and may help people in developing
nations like India ( II ) kerosene, a
leading cause of ( III ) illness and fires.
Working on the principle of flashlights
that charge when shaken, the Soccket
is the (IV) of Harvard students Jessica
Lin, Julia Sitverman, Jessica Matthews
and Hemali Thakker and is being ( V )
by the Cl inton Global Ini tiative
University and the Walmart Foundation.
971. (1) (I) stores
(2) (I) conserves
(3) (I) captures
(4) (I) reserves
972. (1) (II) substitute
(2) (II) replace
(3) (II) restore
(4) (II) supplant
973. (1) (III) pulmonary
(2) (III) respiratory
(3) (III) cardiac
(4) (III) cardio-vascular
974. (1) (IV) output
(2) (IV) achievement
(3) (IV) brainchild
(4) (IV) inventory
975. (1) (V) funded
(2) (V) financed
(3) (V) promoted
(4) (V) sponsored
Question No. (976–980) :
(SSC CPO SI ,oa ASI vkWuykbu
ijh{kk 05-06-2016 izFke ikyh)
The Dalmatian of the sole surviving
semi- speaker, Tuone Udaina, was
surveyed in the late 1870s and again
towards the end of his life in the late
1890s. These fairly extensive records
curiously suggest that a systematic
(976) change took place in those two
decades such that by the 1890s the
distinction between present and
imperfect indicative had largely been
neutralized (a development unique
among Romance languages) in favour
of the imperfect tense is forms. I argue
that the data are authentic and that
the change, whether it occurred just
in Udaina’s head or was already
underway in the last years of Dalmatian
as a spoken language, is purely
‘internal’ and not (977) by contact with
other languages. I explore its internal
mechanisms and show that what is
involved is a kind of analogical formmeaning
levelling whose signatum is an
‘empty’ element of (978) structure.
Reinforcement of this essentially
‘nonsensical’ (979) of paradigmatic
structure constitutes further evidence
for my general view that
intraparadigmatic coherence may be
no less important than
extramorphological transparency. It
also suggests that such a development
can as easily (980) in a dying language
as anyhwere else.
dfBu ‘[email protected];ka’kk sa oQs vFkZ
(1) Dalmatian (N.) : a Romance
language of Dalmatia (Australian
Province) (extinct since 19th
century) : Dalmatia dh Romance
Hkk”kk
(2) signatum (N.) : that which is
indicated/designated by
something; signified : fpÞud
(3) paradigmatic (Adj.) : that is a
typical example/pattern of
something : izfrekukRed
(4) coherence (N.) : the situation in
which all the parts of something
fit together well : lEc¼rk
(5) morphological (Adj.) : connected
with the forms of words : :ikRed
(6) aberration (N.) : a fact, an
action/a way of behaving that is
not usual, and that may be
unacceptable : efrHkaz’k_ Hkze
(7) oddity (N.) : the quality of being
strange/unusual : fofp=krk
976. (1) morphological
(2) misleading
(3) nonsensical
(4) common
977. (1) deters (2) motivated
(3) encourages (4) restores
SEH–812
CLOZE TEST
978. (1) vulnerable
(2) paradigmatic
(3) indifferent
(4) unsuitable
979. (1) hazard (2) aberration
(3) fluke (4) oddity
980. (1) occur (2) defy
(3) ensured (4) occurrence
Question No. (981–1000) :
(SSC (10+2) LVsuksxzkiQj xzsMμ‘C’ ,oa ‘D’
ijh{kkμ31-07-2016)
PASSAGE I
How old is the Earth ? This is a
(981) to which we may never have the
exact (982). Man has (983) about the
age of the Earth since (984) times, and
there were all kinds of myths and (985)
that seemed to have the answer. When
it was proven that the Earth (986)
around the Sun, (987) then knew where
to begin. To find the (988) of the Earth,
it was necessary to (989) how the solar
system was (990).
981. (1) question (2) debate
(3) fact (4) point
982. (1) logic (2) answer
(3) deduction (4) reason
983. (1) marvelled (2) thought
(3) asked (4) wondered
984. (1) bygone (2) olden
(3) ancient (4) antiquated
985. (1) legends (2) fables
(3) story (4) tale
986. (1) rotated (2) moved
(3) revolved (4) circled
987. (1) scholars
(2) academicians
(3) students (4) scientists
988. (1) age (2) date
(3) oldness (4) years
989. (1) narrate (2) recount
(3) explain (4) tell
990. (1) originated (2) formed
(3) begun (4) born
PASSAGE II
One thing we can do is (991) a good
book. Another is to look at a new (992)
conducted by William Mercer, one of
the world’s largest Human Resources
consultancies. Mercer decided to (993)
some of the world’s great cities. They
produced their results by giving (994)
for (995) criteria. These included political,
economic and social environment,
healthcare, educational provision,
recreation and transport (996).
So, which are the best cities to live in,
and which should we (997) ? In (998)
first place were Vancouver, Berne, Vienna
and Zurich, while Sydney, Geneva,
Auckland and Copenhagen came in
second. Swiss cities (999) three of the
top ten places, making it the single
most successful country of all those
(1000).
991. (1) read (2) obtain
(3) retrieve (4) look
992. (1) research (2) consultation
(3) advice (4) survey
993. (1) decide (2) judge
(3) rule (4) proclaim
994. (1) spots (2) marks
(3) places (4) signs
995. (1) ranging (2) assorted
(3) different (4) various
996. (1) reasons (2) facilities
(3) versions (4) ways
997. (1) deny (2) regret
(3) avoid (4) escape
998. (1) dual (2) united
(3) together (4) joint
999. (1) controlled (2) absorbed
(3) vacated (4) occupied
1000. (1) surveyed
(2) experimented
(3) established
(4) created

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